International Whistleblower & Foreign Currupt Practices Act Information

International Whistleblower Rewards and Exposing International Illegal Bribe Schemes

by The Law Offices of Jason S. Coomer, PLLC

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Middle East International Bribery Schemes: Middle East Whistleblowers Can Earn Large Financial Rewards By Anonymously Exposing Bribery Schemes
by Middle East Whistleblower Reward Lawyer and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Lawyer Jason Coomer

New Whistleblower Reward Laws are offering large financial rewards to Middle East professionals and Middle East residents who properly expose Multinational Corporations that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to Middle Eastern government officials and former government officials in exchange for construction contracts, mining contracts, drilling contracts, public health care pharmaceutical contracts, customs false certifications through Middle Eastern ports, and other international business advantages.  These rewards can be collected anonymously by Middle East Whistleblowers who are represented by a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Lawyer.  The Middle East Whistleblower must have original information regarding significant bribes or fraud and must be the first to properly file regarding the bribery scheme or fraud scheme.

If you are aware of illegal international trade practices including violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA) by a large corporations, please feel free to contact Middle East Whistleblower Reward Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form for a confidential review of a Middle East Africa Whistleblower Reward Bounty Action.

The Arab Spring, Imposition of Economic Sanctions, and West African Bribes, Kickbacks, and Corruption Have Resulted in West African Anti-Bribery Laws That Combine With The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act To Allow West African Whistleblowers to Collect Large Financial Rewards For Properly Exposing Large Corporations Who Are Bribing Government Officials

The Middle East is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia and Egypt and includes the countries of Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The region has an estimated population of 210,000,000.

The Middle Eastern economies range from very poor to extremely wealthy.  Much of the disparity of wealth in the Middle East relates to the presence of oil.  Three of the largest economies in the Middle east are Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iran in terms of Nominal GDP and GDP-PPP. The highest ranking Middle Eastern countries regarding nominal GDP per capita are Qatar, the UAE, Kuwait, and Cyprus.  The economic structure of Middle Eastern nations are different in the sense that while some nations are heavily dependent on export of only oil and oil-related products (such as Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Kuwait), others have a highly diverse economic base (such as Cyprus, Israel, Turkey and Egypt). Industries of the Middle Eastern region include oil and oil-related products, agriculture, cotton, cattle, dairy, textiles, leather products, surgical instruments, defense equipment (guns, ammunition, tanks, submarines, fighter jets, UAVs, and missiles). Banking is also an important sector of the economies, especially in the case of UAE and Bahrain.

Authorities in the United States continue  to make use of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (1977), which has resulted in a number of high profile prosecutions and financial settlements for companies regarding their conduct in the Middle East.

Three Subsidiaries of Weatherford International Limited Agree to Plead Guilty to FCPA and Export Control Violations Weatherford International and Subsidiaries Agree to Pay $252 Million in Penalties and Fines

Three subsidiaries of Weatherford International Limited (Weatherford International), a Swiss oil services company that trades on the New York Stock Exchange, have agreed to plead guilty to anti-bribery provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and export controls violations under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) and the Trading with the Enemy Act (TWEA). Weatherford International and its subsidiaries have also agreed to pay more than $252 million in penalties and fines. Acting Assistant Attorney General Mythili Raman of the Justice Department Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Kenneth Magidson of the Southern District of Texas, and Assistant Director in Charge Valerie Parlave of the FBI's Washington Field Office made the announcement. Weatherford Services Limited (Weatherford Services), a subsidiary of Weatherford International, today agreed to plead guilty to violating the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA. As part of a coordinated FCPA resolution, the department today also filed a criminal information in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas charging Weatherford International with one count of violating the internal controls provisions of the FCPA. To resolve the charge, Weatherford International has agreed to pay an $87.2 million criminal penalty as part of a deferred prosecution agreement with the department. "Effective internal accounting controls are not only good policy, they are required by law for publicly traded companies-and for good reason," said Acting Assistant Attorney General Raman. "This case demonstrates how loose controls and an anemic compliance environment can foster foreign bribery and fraud by a company's subsidiaries around the globe. Although Weatherford's extensive remediation and its efforts to improve its compliance functions are positive signs, the corrupt conduct of Weatherford International's subsidiaries allowed it to earn millions of dollars in illicit profits, for which it is now paying a significant price." "When business executives engage in bribery and pay-offs in order to obtain contracts, an uneven marketplace is created and honest competitor companies are put at a disadvantage," said Assistant Director in Charge Parlave. "The FBI is committed to investigating corrupt backroom deals that influence contract procurement and threaten our global commerce." In a separate matter, Weatherford International and four of its subsidiaries today agreed to pay a combined $100 million to resolve a criminal and administrative export controls investigation conducted by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Texas, the Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security, and the Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control. As part of the resolution of that investigation, Weatherford International has agreed to enter into a deferred prosecution agreement for a term of two years and two of its subsidiaries have agreed to plead guilty to export controls charges. "The resolution today of these criminal charges represents the seriousness that our office and the Department of Justice puts on enforcing the export control and sanctions laws," said U.S. Attorney Magidson. In a related FCPA matter, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filed a settlement today in which Weatherford International consented to the entry of a permanent injunction against FCPA violations and agreed to pay $65,612,360 in disgorgement, prejudgment interest, and civil penalties. Weatherford International also agreed with the SEC to comply with certain undertakings regarding its FCPA compliance program, including the retention of an independent corporate compliance monitor. The combined investigations resulted in the conviction of three Weatherford subsidiaries, the entry by Weatherford International into two deferred prosecution agreements and a civil settlement, and the payment of a total of $252,690,606 in penalties and fines.

Subsidiary of Tyco International Ltd. Pleads Guilty, Is Sentenced for Conspiracy to Violate Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Tyco Entities Agree to More Than $26 Million in Penalties

Tyco International Ltd. - together with a subsidiary that pleaded guilty this morning to a criminal charge for conspiring to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) - has agreed to pay more than $26 million to resolve the conspiracy charge with the Department of Justice and charges with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia Neil H. MacBride. As part of the more than $26 million, Tyco - a company based in Switzerland that manufactures and sells products related to security, fire protection and energy - has agreed to pay a $13.68 million penalty for falsifying books and records in connection with payments by its subsidiaries to government officials in various countries in order to obtain and retain business . Tyco Valves & Controls Middle East Inc. (TVC ME) - an indirect, wholly owned subsidiary of Tyco that sold and marketed valves and other industrial equipment throughout the Middle East for the oil, gas, petrochemical, commercial construction, water treatment and desalination industries - pleaded guilty this morning before U.S. District Judge Claude M.Hilton for conspiring to violate the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA. According to the criminal information to which TVC ME pleaded guilty, the company paid bribes to officials employed by Saudi Aramco, an oil and gas company controlled and managed by the government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in order to obtain contracts with Saudi Aramco. At the conclusion of the plea proceeding, the court sentenced TVC ME to pay a $2.1 million fine, which is included as part of the $13.68 million penalty. "Today, a Tyco subsidiary pleaded guilty to bribing officials of state-owned entities in various countries to score valuable petroleum contracts and, with Tyco International, agreed to pay nearly $14 million in penalties," said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. "Together with the SEC, we are leading a fight against corruption around the globe." "For more than 10 years, various Tyco entities bribed foreign officials and cooked the books to hide the payments," said U.S. Attorney MacBride. "The Eastern District of Virginia has a strong partnership working with the Criminal Division's Fraud Section on FCPA cases and is aggressively using venue provisions to hold FCPA violators accountable for their conduct." As part of the settlement, the department entered into a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with Tyco. According to the NPA, a number of Tyco's subsidiaries made payments, both directly and indirectly, to government officials in order to obtain and retain business with private and state-owned entities, and falsely described the payments in Tyco's corporate books, records and accounts as legitimate charges. From 1999 to 2009, Tyco knowingly conspired to falsify its books and records in connection with these payments. In addition to the monetary penalty, Tyco and TVC ME also agreed to cooperate with the department, to report periodically to the department concerning the companies' compliance efforts, and to continue to implement an enhanced compliance program and internal controls designed to prevent and detect FCPA violations. The agreement acknowledges Tyco's timely, voluntary and complete disclosure, its cooperation - including a global internal investigation concerning bribery and related misconduct - and its extensive remediation. That remediation includes the implementation of an enhanced compliance program, the termination of employees responsible for the improper payments and falsification of books and records, the severing of contracts with the responsible third-party agents and the closing of subsidiaries due to compliance failures. In the parallel civil proceedings, Tyco consented with the SEC to a proposed final judgment that orders the company to pay $10,564,992 in disgorgement and $2,566,517 in prejudgment interest - which, together with the Department of Justice penalty, totals more than $26 million.

International Professionals and Middle Eastern Whistleblowers Are Encouraged Through Large Financial Rewards and Whistleblower Confidentiality Protections to Expose Violations of The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and International Sanctions

Foreign multinational corporations who illegally bribe Middle Eastern government officials and former government officials can be held accountable when they violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and other anti-bribery laws. These laws prevent government corruption including illegal payments to customs agents, bribes for construction contracts, illegal kickbacks for regulatory approval, and other illegal business practices. Through the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), whistleblowers are encouraged to step up and confidentially report corruption. Under new whistleblower protections, these Middle Eastern whistleblowers and International Professionals can confidentially report violations through a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawyer and receive large financial rewards for being the first to properly expose significant government corruption.

If you are aware of illegal international trade practices including violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA) by a multinational corporation in the Middle East, please feel free to contact Middle East Whistleblower Reward Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form.

Middle East Bribery Schemes and Sanction Violations Can Be The Basis For Bounty Actions and Other Whistleblower Reward Lawsuits

Corporations that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to government officials and former government officials in exchange for contracts including large building projects can be brought to justice and made to pay large penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and whistleblowers that bring these corporations to justice may be able to collect large economic rewards under the Securities Exchange Act (SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions) and the Commodity Exchange Act (CFTC Whisteblower Bounty Actions).

The Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback. In cases where $100,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $100 million building project, the Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $100,000,000.00 and the $100,000.00 translating into a $10 million to $30 million award.

As an US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Violation Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer commonly works with other powerful illegal international business contract bribe and whistleblower lawyers to handle large Multinational SEC Corporation Lawsuits.

If you are aware of illegal international trade practices including violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA) by a multinational corporation in Middle East, please feel free to contact International Business Whistleblower Reward Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form.

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