International Whistleblower & Foreign Currupt Practices Act Information

International Whistleblower Rewards and Exposing International Illegal Bribe Schemes

by The Law Offices of Jason S. Coomer, PLLC

Map Of The World

International Whistleblowers Are Receiving Large Rewards for Exposing Government Procurement Bribery Schemes and other Government Corruption by International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, International  Procurement Contract Bribe Lawyer, and International Procurement Illegal Kickback Whistleblower Attorney Jason S. Coomer

Worldwide government purchasing or government procurement is estimated to be over $10 Trillion each year.  Of this large amount of government purchasing, it is estimated that as much as 20% may be through illegal bribes, kickbacks, and other illicit payments.  Government procurement spending includes military spending; public works projects; public health care (pharmaceuticals, medical equipment, & hospitals); ports, transportation, & roads; mining and oil extraction; power grid and stations; education; law enforcement; and sanitation services.  Because of the vast amount of money spent by governments on government procurement, there are many different types of government procurement illegal bribery schemes, illegal kickback schemes, and other illicit payment schemes that have been created to steal money from the public at the expense of a country's citizens.

If you are aware of a government procurement illegal bribery scheme, illegal kickback scheme, and other illicit payment scheme, it is important that you learn how to properly report the government corruption and determine the best way to expose the corruption.  To help determine if a large government corruption scheme may be a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, please feel free to send an e-mail message to International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Attorney, Public Procurement Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, and Government Purchasing Bribe Whistleblower Reward Attorney Jason Coomer or use our submission form.  

International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Rewards, International Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuits, Procurement Illegal Kickback Bounty Actions, and Government Procurement Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawsuit Information

International government procurement whistleblowers can recover large amounts of money for exposing international government procurement kickback schemes, international government bribery schemes, and other violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.  Some types of these international government procurement illegal bribery schemes, international illegal kickback schemes, and other international illicit payment schemes are discussed in more detail below.

International executives, government officials, employees of international corrupt corporations, competitors of corrupt international corporations, and other persons, who are the original source of specialized knowledge of international government procurement bribes, international public works illegal kickback schemes, public health system procurement bribery schemes, and other illicit payments are encouraged to blow the whistle on international government procurement schemes and may be able to collect large financial rewards for exposing the corruption. 

For more information on a potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, please feel free to send an e-mail message to International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Attorney, Public Procurement Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, and Government Purchasing Bribe Whistleblower Reward Attorney Jason Coomer or use our submission form to discuss a potential International Public Procurement Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Government Procurement Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Government Purchase Contract Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, Government Procurement Illegal Kickback Lawsuit, or other Government Official Procurement Bribe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Lawsuit. 

International Government Procurement Bribery Schemes, International Procurement Illegal Kickback Schemes, and Other Illicit Payment Information

There are a variety of procurement fraud illegal bribery schemes, illegal kickback schemes, and illicit payment schemes.  These illegal government procurement schemes include simple cash bribes paid to a government official for a government procurement contract to elaborate illegal kickback schemes through multiple agents, foreign banks, slush funds, and corporations.

The allegations in the below Siemens bribery scheme cases include complicated government procurement illicit payment schemes including the use of falsified documents (false invoices and sham consulting contracts) as well as the use of consulting intermediaries in an attempt to hide the illegal kickbacks that were used to obtain lucrative government procurement contracts.  A common element in international government procurement bribery schemes include required intermediaries or specific consultants that are used to funnel money back to the public officials that selected the government contractor. This consultant kickback scheme creates third parties to send the procurement money through to conceal the bribes.


SEC Charges Seven Former Siemens Executives With Bribing Leaders in Argentina

The Securities and Exchange Commission filed a Civil Action on December 13, 2011, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, charging seven former senior executives of Siemens AG (“Siemens”) and its regional company in Argentina with violations of the anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in connection with a decade-long scheme to bribe senior government officials in Argentina, including two Presidents and Cabinet Ministers in two Presidential administrations. One of the executives was also a payment intermediary for Siemens. According to the SEC complaint, the seven individuals charged today, all foreign nationals, paid scores of millions of dollars in bribes for Siemens to obtain and retain a $1 billion contract to produce national identity cards for Argentine citizens.

The SEC alleges that over $100 million in bribes were paid in connection with Siemens’ efforts to secure the contract and obtain the profits from that contract. The defendants charged in the scheme are Uriel Sharef, Ulrich Bock, Carlos Sergi, Stephan Signer, Herbert Steffen, Andres Truppel, and Bernd Regendantz. The most senior of these, Uriel Sharef, is a former Siemens Managing Board member. The SEC alleges that in furtherance of the scheme, the defendants falsified documents, including invoices and sham consulting contracts, participated in meetings in the United States to negotiate the terms of bribe payments, and made use of U.S. bank accounts to pay bribes. According to the SEC’s complaint, the bribery scheme lasted for more than a decade, from approximately 1996 until early 2007.

The SEC previously charged Siemens in December 2008 with FCPA violations in Argentina and numerous other countries around the world. Siemens paid over $1.6 billion to resolve the charges with the Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich, Germany.

The SEC’s complaint alleges that:

From approximately 1996 until early 2007, senior executives at Siemens and its regional company in Argentina, Siemens S.A. (“Siemens Argentina”), paid bribes to senior Argentine government officials – including two Presidents, and Cabinet Ministers in two Presidential administrations. The bribes were initially paid to secure a $1 billion government contract (the “DNI Contract”) to produce national identity cards, or Documentos Nacionales de Identidad, for every Argentine citizen. Later, after a change in Argentine political administrations resulted in the DNI Contract being suspended and then canceled, Siemens paid additional bribes in a failed effort to bring the DNI Contract back into force. Still later, after the company instituted an arbitration proceeding to recover its costs and expected profits from the canceled DNI Contract, Siemens paid additional bribes to suppress evidence that the DNI Contract had originally been obtained through corruption.

Over the course of the bribery scheme, over $100 million in bribes were paid, approximately $31.3 million of which were made after March 12, 2001, when Siemens became a U.S. issuer subject to U.S. securities laws. As a result of the bribe payments it made, Siemens received an arbitration award in 2007 against the government of Argentina of over $217 million plus interest for the DNI Contract. In August 2009, after settling bribery charges with the U.S. and Germany, Siemens waived the arbitration award.

During the relevant 2001 to 2007 time period, defendants Uriel Sharef, Ulrich Bock, Carlos Sergi, Stephan Signer, Herbert Steffen, Andres Truppel, and Bernd Regendantz each had a role in authorizing, negotiating, facilitating, or concealing bribe payments in connection with the DNI Contract. Siemens employed a group of consultants, designated the Project Group and led by defendant Sergi, to serve as payment intermediaries between the company and the Argentine government officials.

Each of the defendants violated Section 30A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) by engaging in the bribery of government officials in Argentina. Each defendant also aided and abetted Siemens’ violations of Section 30A. The defendants also violated Exchange Act Section 13(b)(5) and Rule 13b2-1 thereunder by authorizing or directing others to falsify documents, including invoices and sham consulting contracts, in furtherance of the bribery scheme. Defendant Regendantz violated Rule 13b2-2 by signing false internal certifications pursuant to the Sarbanes Oxley Act (“SOX”). All defendants aided and abetted Siemens’ violations of Exchange Act Sections 13(b)(2)(A) and 13(b)(2)(B) by substantially assisting in Siemens’ failure to maintain internal controls to detect and prevent bribery of government officials in Argentina, and by substantially assisting in the improper recording of the bribe payments in Siemens’ accounting books and records. The SEC’s complaint seeks permanent injunctive relief, disgorgement and civil penalties from the defendants.

Without admitting or denying the SEC’s allegations, defendant Bernd Regendantz has consented to the entry of a final judgment that permanently enjoins him from future violations of Sections 30A and 13(b)(5) of the Exchange Act, and Rules 13b2-1 and 13b2-2 thereunder, and from aiding and abetting violations of Exchange Act Sections 30A, 13(b)(2)(A), and 13(b)(2)(B); and orders him to pay a civil penalty of $40,000, deemed satisfied by Regendantz’ payment of a €30,000 administrative fine ordered by the Public Prosecutor General in Munich, Germany.

The SEC appreciates the assistance of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Fraud Section, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich, Germany. [SEC v. Uriel Sharef, Ulrich Bock, Carlos Sergi, Stephan Signer, Herbert Steffen, Andres Truppel and Bernd Regendantz, Civil Action No. 11 civ 9073 (Judge Scheidlin/Pitman) (S.D.N.Y.)] (LR-22190; AAE Rel. 3342)


SEC Charges Siemens AG for Engaging in Worldwide Bribery FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 2008-294

Washington, D.C., Dec. 15, 2008 — The Securities and Exchange Commission today announced an unprecedented settlement with Siemens AG to resolve SEC charges that the Munich, Germany-based manufacturer of industrial and consumer products violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) by engaging in a systematic practice of paying bribes to foreign government officials to obtain business. Additional Materials

Litigation Release No. 20829 SEC Complaint

The SEC alleges that Siemens paid bribes on such widespread transactions as the design and construction of metro transit lines in Venezuela, power plants in Israel, and refineries in Mexico. Siemens also used bribes to obtain such business as developing mobile telephone networks in Bangladesh, national identity cards in Argentina, and medical devices in Vietnam, China, and Russia. According to the SEC's complaint, Siemens also paid kickbacks to Iraqi ministries in connection with sales of power stations and equipment to Iraq under the United Nations Oil for Food Program. Siemens earned more than $1.1 billion in profits on these and several other transactions.

Siemens has agreed to pay $350 million in disgorgement to settle the SEC's charges, and a $450 million fine to the U.S. Department of Justice to settle criminal charges. Siemens also will pay a fine of approximately $569 million to the Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich, to whom the company previously paid an approximately $285 million fine in October 2007.

"Public companies that bribe foreign officials are confronting an increasingly well-coordinated international law enforcement effort," said SEC Chairman Christopher Cox. "The SEC has brought a record number of enforcement actions for foreign bribery during the past two years, and heightened international cooperation has been critical to those successful efforts. Seimens paid staggering amounts of money to circumvent the rules and gain business. Now, they will pay for it with the largest settlement in the history of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act since it became law in 1977."

Linda Chatman Thomsen, Director of the SEC's Division of Enforcement, said, "This pattern of bribery by Siemens was unprecedented in scale and geographic reach. The corruption alleged in the SEC's complaint involved more than $1.4 billion in bribes to government officials in Asia, Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Our success in bringing the company to justice is a testament to the close, coordinated working relationship among the SEC, the U.S. Department of Justice, and international law enforcement, particularly the Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich."

Cheryl J. Scarboro, an Associate Director in the SEC's Division of Enforcement, said, "The day is past when multi-national corporations could regard illicit payments to foreign officials as simply another cost of doing business. The $1.6 billion in combined sanctions that Siemens will pay in the U.S. and Germany should make clear that these corrupt business practices will be rooted out wherever they take place, and the sanctions for them will be severe."

The SEC's complaint alleges that between March 12, 2001, and Sept. 30, 2007, Siemens created elaborate payment schemes to conceal the nature of its corrupt payments, and the company's inadequate internal controls allowed the conduct to flourish. Siemens made thousands of payments to third parties in ways that obscured the purpose for, and the ultimate recipients of, the money. Employees obtained large amounts of cash from cash desks, which were sometimes transported in suitcases across international borders for bribery. The authorizations for payments were placed on post-it notes and later removed to eradicate any permanent record. Siemens used numerous slush funds, off-books accounts maintained at unconsolidated entities, and a system of business consultants and intermediaries to facilitate the corrupt payments. Siemens made at least 4,283 payments, totaling approximately $1.4 billion, to bribe government officials in return for business to Siemens around the world. In addition, Siemens made approximately 1,185 separate payments to third parties totaling approximately $391 million, which were not properly controlled and were used, at least in part, for such illicit purposes as commercial bribery and embezzlement.

The misconduct involved employees at all levels, including former senior management, and revealed a corporate culture long at odds with the FCPA. The SEC's complaint alleges that despite the company's knowledge of bribery at two of its largest groups — Communications and Power Generation — the tone at the top at Siemens was inconsistent with an effective FCPA compliance program and created a corporate culture in which bribery was tolerated and even rewarded at the highest levels of the company. In November 2006, Siemens' current management began to implement reforms to the company's internal controls, which substantially reduced, but did not entirely eliminate, corrupt payments. All but $27.5 million of the corrupt payments occurred before Nov. 15, 2006.

Siemens violated Section 30A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) by making illicit payments to foreign government officials in order to obtain or retain business. Siemens violated Section 13(b)(2)(B) of the Exchange Act by failing to have adequate internal controls to detect and prevent the payments. Siemens violated Section 13(b)(2)(A) of the Exchange Act by improperly recording the payments in its books and records.

Without admitting or denying the SEC's allegations, Siemens has consented to the entry of a court order permanently enjoining it from future violations of Sections 30A, 13(b)(2)(A), and 13(b)(2)(B) of the Exchange Act; ordering it to pay $350 million in disgorgement of wrongful profits, which does not include profits factored into Munich's fine; and ordering it to comply with certain undertakings regarding its FCPA compliance program, including an independent monitor for a period of four years. Since being approached by SEC staff, Siemens has cooperated fully with the ongoing investigation. Siemens' massive internal investigation and lower level employee amnesty program was essential in gathering facts regarding the full extent of Siemens' FCPA violations.

The SEC acknowledges the assistance of the U.S. Department of Justice, Fraud Section; the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia, Fraud and Public Corruption Section; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Internal Revenue Service; the Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich, Germany; the U.K. Financial Services Authority; and the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission.


Another common government procurement bribery scheme includes attempts to disguise direct payments to procurement officials as something else. An example of this government bribery scheme can be seen in the Johnson & Johnson case, where the company funneled money to procurement authorities at state-owned hospitals by using sales agents to award “civil contracts” to doctors, purportedly to conduct trainings for the company that never actually happened.


Johnson & Johnson Agrees to Pay $21.4 Million Criminal Penalty to Resolve Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and Oil for Food Investigations Company to Pay Total Penalties of $70 Million in Resolutions with Justice Department and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

 

WASHINGTON – Johnson & Johnson (J&J) has agreed to pay a $21.4 million criminal penalty as part of a deferred prosecution agreement with the Department of Justice to resolve improper payments by J&J subsidiaries to government officials in Greece, Poland and Romania in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), the Justice Department’s Criminal Division announced today.   The agreement also resolves kickbacks paid to the former government of Iraq under the United Nations Oil for Food Program.

 

J&J is headquartered in New Brunswick, N.J., and is listed on the New York Stock Exchange.   The company manufactures and sells medical devices, pharmaceuticals and consumer health care products.

 

“Today, Johnson & Johnson has admitted that its subsidiaries, employees and agents paid bribes to publicly-employed health care providers in Greece, Poland and Romania, and that kickbacks were paid on behalf of Johnson & Johnson subsidiary companies to the former government of Iraq under the United Nations Oil for Food program,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Mythili Raman of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.”  “Johnson & Johnson, however, has also cooperated extensively with the government and, as a result, has played an important role in identifying improper practices in the life sciences industry.   As today’s agreement reflects, we are committed to holding corporations accountable for bribing foreign officials while, at the same time, giving meaningful credit to companies that self-report and cooperate with our investigations.”

 

According to the agreement, J&J has acknowledged responsibility for the actions of its subsidiaries, employees and agents who made various improper payments to publicly-employed health care providers in Greece, Poland and Romania in order to induce the purchase of medical devices and pharmaceuticals manufactured by J&J subsidiaries.   J&J also acknowledged that kickbacks were paid on behalf of J&J subsidiary companies to the former government of Iraq under the United Nations Oil for Food Program in order to secure contracts to provide humanitarian supplies. A criminal information, filed in U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia in connection with the deferred prosecution agreement, charges J&J subsidiary DePuy Inc. with conspiracy and violations of the FCPA in connection with the payments to public physicians in Greece.  

 

The agreement recognizes J&J’s timely voluntary disclosure, and thorough and wide-reaching self-investigation of the underlying conduct; the extraordinary cooperation provided by the company to the department, the SEC and multiple foreign enforcement authorities, including significant assistance in the industry-wide investigation; and the extensive remedial efforts and compliance improvements undertaken by the company.   In addition, J&J received a reduction in its criminal fine as a result of its cooperation in the ongoing investigation of other companies and individuals, as outlined in the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines.   J&J’s fine was also reduced in light of its anticipated resolution in the United Kingdom.   Due to J&J’s pre-existing compliance and ethics programs, extensive remediation, and improvement of its compliance systems and internal controls, as well as the enhanced compliance undertakings included in the agreement, J&J was not required to retain a corporate monitor, but it must report to the department on implementation of its remediation and enhanced compliance efforts every six months for the duration of the agreement.   

In a related matter, J&J reached a settlement today with the SEC under which it agreed to pay more than $48.6 million in disgorgement of profits, including pre-judgment interest.

 

This case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Kathleen M Hamann of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section with assistance from the FBI’s Washington Field Office’s dedicated FCPA squad.   The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided assistance in this matter.

 

The Justice Department acknowledges and expresses its appreciation for the significant assistance provided by the authorities of the 8th Ordinary Interrogation Department of the Athens Court of First Instance and the Athens Economic Crime Squad in Greece; the 5th Investigation Department of the Regional Prosecutor’s Office in Radom, Poland; the Fraud Squad of the West Yorkshire Police Department in the United Kingdom; and the SEC’s Division of Enforcement, as well as the coordination and cooperation with the authorities of the United Kingdom’s Serious Fraud Office.


According to Bloomberg news, "Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), the world’s second-biggest seller of medical products, will pay $70 million after admitting that the company bribed doctors in Europe and paid kickbacks in Iraq to win contracts and sell drugs and artificial joints." Johnson & Johnson Will Pay $70 Million Over Bribery Claims By Joshua Gallu and Alex Nussbaum - Apr 8, 2011 2:09 PM CT 

The SEC Complaint alleges that Johnson & Johnson through subsidiaries paid bribes to key health care provider decision makers including doctors and hospital administrators in several countries to win large contracts under the U.N. oil-for-food program. Further, the SEC alleged that Johnson & Johnson used slush funds, sham contracts and off-shore companies to carry out large bribes to key medical decision makers to secure large contracts and reward these decision makers for selecting Johnson & Johnson.

"The company agreed to pay $48.6 million in disgorgement and interest to settle the SEC’s claims and a $21.4 million fine to settle criminal charges filed by the Justice Department. As part of a deferred prosecution agreement with Justice, J&J admitted to the allegations and agreed to report on remediation and compliance measures every six months for three years." Johnson & Johnson Will Pay $70 Million Over Bribery Claims By Joshua Gallu and Alex Nussbaum - Apr 8, 2011 2:09 PM CT 

Numerous other types of international government procurement bribery schemes exists including the use of foreign banks, government official relatives, subsidiaries of international companies, false accounting documents, and other third party intermediary and fraudulent accounting practices to disguise sophisticated international government procurement bribery schemes.

The World Trade Organization and many countries are working to limit the amount of government corruption and greed involved in international government procurement.  These efforts include increasing transparency in government procurement contracts as well as offering large international whistleblower financial rewards and international whistleblower protections to encourage persons with specialized and original knowledge of these crimes to step forward and expose the corrupt procurement practices.  For more information on WTO efforts to reduce corruption in government procurement, please go to the following WTO web page.  For more information on the international government procurement whistleblower rewards and protections,   please feel free to send an e-mail message to International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, International Procurement Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, and International Procurement Bribery Scheme Whistleblower Reward Lawyer Jason Coomer

International Medicines Supply Chain Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, International Medicines Chain Drug Contract Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, Medicine Contract Illegal Kickback Lawyer, Medicines Chain Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, Medicines Supply Chain Fraud Lawyer, and Medicines Supply Chain Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawyer

Every year over $4.1 trillion (US dollars) is spent worldwide on health services including approximately $750 billion (US dollars) that is spent in the pharmaceutical market on drugs and medications. It is estimated that approximately 10 to 25% of public health care procurement spending including drug contracts, medicines, pharmaceuticals, medical equipment, and medical devices is lost to corrupt and fraudulent acts.  These acts include government official bribes, illegal kickbacks, and other illicit payment and fraud schemes.

For more information on this topic, please go to the following web page on International Medicines Supply Chain Whistleblower Reward Lawsuits and International Medicines Chain Drug Contract Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuits.

Foreign Corporation Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, Domestic Corporation Illegal Kickback Lawsuit, Violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Lawsuit,  FCPA SEC  Whistleblower Lawsuit, SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Lawsuit, & Illegal Corporate Bribe Bounty Lawsuit Information

Corporations that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to government officials and former government officials in exchange for contracts including health care procurements (medication procurements, medical equipment procurements, drug procurements, medicine procurements, medical device procurements, and pharmaceutical procurements) can be brought to justice and made to pay large penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and whistleblowers that bring these corporations to justice may be able to collect large economic rewards under the  Securities Exchange Act (SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions).

The International Medicine Procurement Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Public Health System Procurement Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback.  In cases where $100,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $900 million procurement project, the Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $900,000,000.00 and the $100,000.00 translating into a $90 million to $270 million award.

International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Reward Lawyers, International Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Lawyers, Procurement Illegal Kickback Lawyers, and Government Procurement Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawyers

If you are an international drug marketing representative, international drug marketing executive, international medical device marketing representative, international medical device marketing executive, public health administrator, medical doctor, or other professional with original source knowledge of a potential International Government Procurement Illegal Kickback Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Public Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Government Contract Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, International Government Contract Illegal Kickback Lawsuit, and International Government Procurement Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawsuit or Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violation that could lead to an International Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, please contact an international foreign corrupt practice act whistleblower reward lawyer to help expose the wrongdoing and protect yourself.

International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, International Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, Procurement Illegal Kickback Lawyer, and Government Procurement Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Lawyer

For more information on a potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, please feel free to send an e-mail message to International Government Procurement Bribe Whistleblower Attorney, Public Procurement Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, and Government Purchasing Bribe Whistleblower Reward Attorney Jason Coomer or use our submission form to discuss a potential International Public Procurement Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Government Procurement Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, International Government Purchase Contract Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, Government Procurement Illegal Kickback Lawsuit, or other Government Official Procurement Bribe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Lawsuit. 

Feel Free to Contact Us
with any Questions
* Name (Required):
* Email (Required):
Phone Number:
* Your Message (Required):
Anti-spam Question:
*Using only numbers,
what is 2 plus 2?

FedGovFraud.com

Illegal Kickback Lawsuits

FCPA Lawsuits

SEC Violation Lawsuits

Securities Fraud Litigation